Tactics from the 2013 McGill Open Chess Championship

With the recent completion of the 2013 McGill Open Chess Championship, I bring to you a couple of hard-fought games in which one side was able to seal the deal with a decisive tactic. Can you spot what these players saw over the board and replicate their winning moves?

IMAGE( http://i.imgur.com/wIXtErk.jpg )

T. Libersan (2026) – J.-M. Bouchard (2090), McGill Open 2013

Here, Black just played 1. … Nd7-b6. How did White secure a winning advantage?

Click below for a hint:

Spoiler: Highlight to view

Try to use White’s battery on the d file to execute a strategic maneuver.

Click below for a second hint:

Spoiler: Highlight to view

Look for a crushing outpost for White’s pieces. 

Click below for the solution:

Spoiler: Highlight to view

White played the thematic maneuver 2. Ne4!, bringing the knight to the dream square on d6 with tempo. The game continued: 2. … Qc6 3. Nd6+ Ke7? (3. … Kf8 was better, bringing the king to safety on g8. 4. Qb4 Kg8) 4. Qb4! Black is lost. The immediate threat is 5. Nf5+ Kd7 6. Qe7#.

4. … Bd7 5. Nxb5+ Kd8 After having won a pawn, White can safely bring the knight back to d6 with a decisive material and positional advantage. 

 

IMAGE( http://i.imgur.com/pL2y6to.jpg )

E. Beaulieu (2204) – H. Massé (2264), McGill Open 2013

Black responded 1. … Rd8 to White’s 1. e3. How can White end the game on the spot?

Click below for a hint:

Spoiler: Highlight to view

Use the vulnerable position of the Black king to your advantage. 

Click below for the solution:

Spoiler: Highlight to view

White ends the game with 2. Rxd4! Black has no way to avoid severe material loss. 2. … cxd4 3. Qc7+ Rd7 4. Qxd7+! The nail in the coffin. 1-0. The point being 4. … Qxd7 Nf6+ and 5. Nxd7, with an easily winning endgame. 

 

Be sure to also check out Felix Dumont's coverage of the 2013 McGill Open as well as FM Michael Kleinman’s analysis of a couple games from the tournament here!

Tags:

Category: